Author: SLEEPON

Sleep position impacts snoring

There are a lot of anti-snoring products out there, throat sprays, special pillows, headset, and opening your nostrils, they may seem like convenient solutions for snoring, but they don’t work.

There isn’t one product that will cure snoring for everybody. In some cases, the position you sleep in may dramatically impact your ability to breathe and exacerbate snoring and sleep apnea.

Sleep position and snoring

If you find yourself sleeping on your back and snoring, it’s time for some “positional therapy”. Try sleeping on your side! Side sleeping is the best sleep position for snoring. This is because side sleeping reduces the compression of your airways. Making this basic change, without the need for any invasive techniques, complicated devices or significant expenditure could have a huge impact on your snoring or sleep apnea.

Homemade hacks

Before you buy something to help you sleep on your side, give some of these free tactics ago:

  • Tennis ball therapy. Tape one or sew a pocket for one to the back of your pajamas to make sleeping on your back difficult.
  • Inflatable pillow prop. Stuff a fully inflated camping pillow into an empty pillowcase. Lie on the empty portion of the pillowcase with your back resting on the inflated pillow.

sleep position

Understanding blood oxygen during sleep

Blood oxygen levels during sleep should be at a 95 percent saturation, which is considered normal, according to the American Sleep Apnea Association (AASM). 

It is normal for blood oxygen levels to decrease during sleep. All body systems have altered basal function during your sleep, including breathing. You don’t breathe as deeply when you are sleeping, and not all your lung spaces function at full capacity. Because of this effect of sleep on breathing, it is normal for your sleep oxygen level to decrease below awake levels. Tests that show a waking oxygen level at or above 94 percent typically indicate a sleep oxygen level of at or above 88 percent.

However, when it persistently drops below maintenance levels, health problems can develop. In addition, certain medical conditions can lead to low oxygen while you are asleep.

Medical Disorders

According to the Mayo Clinic, certain medical problems, especially of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, can lead to blood oxygen below normal levels. The effects of these conditions can worsen while you are sleeping. The most common disorders include:

Diseases of the lungs:

Several lung diseases can narrow or block lung air spaces, inflame or scar lung tissue, and can also interfere with normal breathing patterns. These lung diseases include: 

  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), such as emphysema and chronic bronchitis 
  • Asthma 
  • Cystic fibrosis, a genetic disease that causes a build of mucus in the lungs 
  • Pneumonia and other lung infections 
  • Smoking and lung cancer 

Heart diseases:

Disorders of the heart, which can interfere with blood flow, blood oxygen level, and oxygen supply to tissues include: 

  • Coronary heart disease, a build-up of plaques in the arteries of the heart 
  • Congestive heart failure with leakage of fluid into lung tissue 
  • Congenital heart disease, a developmental defect in the structure of the heart 

Anemia:

The decrease in hemoglobin (Hgb) with anemia lowers the ability of your red blood cells to absorb oxygen from your lungs and carry it to your tissues. Abnormal Hgb, such as with sickle cell anemia, causes the same problem. 

Obesity:

This a cause of sleep apnea where the throat becomes obstructed during sleep and interferes with breathing. Obesity also causes obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS), with diminished deep breathing and oxygen intake. 

Drugs:

Chronic use of prescription or illegal opioids, sedatives, and recreational or other illegal drugs can depress the brain’s breathing center and therefore slow down your breathing and oxygen intake. 

Alcohol:

Abuse of alcohol, especially at bedtime and mixed with drugs, can interfere with normal breathing and sufficient oxygen intake.

Health Consequences

A normal blood oxygen level is vital for normal tissue and cellular function. Therefore, low blood oxygen affects the function of every tissue in the body. A chronic problem of low oxygen levels while sleeping can increase the risk for several health consequences including:

  • Sleep disorders, such as bouts of insomnia
  • Poor sleep quality, such as restless sleep with several awakenings 
  • High blood pressure 
  • Cardiovascular disease including heart failure 
  • Cardiac arrhythmia and a risk for sudden death 
  • Type 2 diabetes 
  • Depressed brain function and possible brain damage 
  • Risk for loss of consciousness, coma, and death

If you think your oxygen level falls below normal while you are sleeping, consult with your doctor. He might suggest a sleep study as part of your evaluation. During an overnight stay in a sleep center, a technician monitors your breathing and other signs, as well as your blood O2 sat with a pulse oximeter during sleep.

blood oxygen

Understanding resting heart rate

Your resting heart rate, or RHR, is how many times your heart beats in one minute while you are at rest. It’s both a gauge of your heart health and a biomarker of aging, it’s one of the simplest and best measures of your health.

A healthy resting heart rate is about 60 beats per minute, but this number varies with age. The normal range for a resting heart rate is between 60 bpm and 100 bpm. Well-conditioned athletes, however, could have a resting heart rate of around 40 bpm. Generally, a lower heart rate at rest implies more efficient heart function and better cardiovascular fitness.

There are many factors that determine your resting heart rate at any moment. These factors include the time of day, your activity level, and your stress level. Keep in mind that the factors that can influence resting heart rate, including:

  • Age
  • Fitness and activity levels
  • Being a smoker
  • Having cardiovascular disease, high cholesterol or diabetes
  • Air temperature
  • Body position (standing up or lying down, for example)
  • Emotions
  • Body size
  • Medications

RHR generally increases with age. Checking the resting heart rate chart below to see how you compare to your age group.

Average resting heart rate for women by age.

Resting heart rate, heart rate variability, and blood pressure are all important measures of heart health. Your resting heart rate (RHR) is the number of times your heart beats per minute. Heart rate variability (HRV) is a measure of the variation in the time between consecutive heartbeats. Lastly, blood pressure is the force of blood flowing through your blood vessels.

How to measure resting heart rate

To take your pulse, place your index finger and your middle finger on one of your pulse points. Then count the number of heartbeats for 15 seconds, then multiply by four.

When should you check your resting heart rate?

The best time to check your resting heart rate is when you wake up in the morning before you get out of bed. Check your RHR at the same time and rested state every day to get an accurate reading.

What is a normal resting heart rate?

Although there’s a wide range of normal, an unusually high or low resting heart rate may indicate an underlying problem. Studies show that having high RHR increases your risk even after controlling for other factors such as physical fitness, blood pressure, and lipid level. Further, an increase in RHR over time is associated with an increased risk of death from heart disease and all-cause mortality.

An optimal heart rate about one beat per second at rest, or (60 bpm). Consequently, for every 10 beats per minute increase, there is a 10 to 20% increased risk of premature death.

What’s a dangerous Resting Heart Rate?

A resting heart rate can be dangerous if it is too fast, tachycardia, or too slow, bradycardia. Tachycardia is generally over 100 bpm and bradycardia is generally below 60 bpm (for non-athletes). A resting heart rate that is too fast or too slow could be the result of a more serious underlying health problem.

Tachycardia, a resting heart rate that is too fast can be caused by congenital heart disease, poor circulation, anemia, hypertension, or injury to the heart, such as a heart attack. It is also associated with a shorter life expectancy.

Bradycardia, a slow resting heart rate, can be caused by hypotension, congenital heart disease, damage to the heart (from heart disease, heart attack, or aging), chronic inflammation, or myocarditis (a heart infection).

If you have a resting heart rate that is too high or too low for an extended period of time, it can cause potentially dangerous health conditions such as heart failure, blood clots, fainting, and sudden cardiac arrest.

if your resting heart rate is consistently above 100 bpm or below 60 bpm (if you are not an athlete), you should see your doctor. Additionally, you should watch for symptoms such as fainting, shortness of breath, feeling dizzy or light-headed, and having chest pain or feeling discomfort or fluttering in your chest.

Exercise that lower RHR

One study put participants through a 12-week aerobic conditioning program of cycling, Stairmaster, and running on a treadmill. Participants dropped their resting heart rate down from an average of 69 to 66, a 3 point drop. When they stopped the aerobic program, however, their resting heart rate went back to around 69 again.

It appears that you must continue exercising to keep your resting heart rate lower. What else can you do?

Foods that Lower RHR

People in the Blue Zones, areas where people live longer than average, eat plenty of beans. One reason beans are so healthy is that they can help lower your pulse.

In one study, participants were given a cup a day of beans, chickpeas, or lentils. Participants lowered their resting heart rate from an average of 74.1 to 70.7, a 3.4 point drop. The change was similar to those in the other study who exercised for 250hours!

Keep Your Doctor Informed of Your RHR

Go2sleep is not meant to diagnose or treat you. It’s intended to help you understand one aspect of your health, your RHR.

Everyone is different and has unique circumstances. Consult with your doctor about any changes in your health.

heart rate, resting heart rate

Our email service support has recovered

Hi, Dear backers,

We are sorry that our email service(service@sleepon.us) was temporarily stopped due to technical problems.

And now the email service support has recovered. Unfortunately, we lost all emails and messages within 12 hours. Please contact us again at service@sleepon.us and we will reply to you as soon as possible.

Thank you.

SLEEPON Team

New Flight mode function is coming!

Hi,

Dear backers. Thank you for your support.

SLEEPON is always caring for our users. Now the flight mode function is coming and you can use it next week!

Flight mode is a new function of the GO2SLEEP ring. This function can make the device automatically in flight mode and turn off the Bluetooth communication of the device (GO2SLEEP) to reduce the impact of radiation on you.

After the flight mode is turned on, the flight mode will be activated or canceled depending on the device is worn on the hand or not. Therefore, the flight mode will affect the real-time detection function (you need to turn off the flight mode to use it).

When you are in the flight mode, it doesn’t affect all the tracking functions of the device like sleep monitoring, low blood oxygen alert, alarm clock, and other functions.

There are more new exciting functions is coming!

Have a nice day

SLEEPON Team

Letter from SLEEPON – Advices to navigate the COVID-19

Hi Dear Backers!

Thank you for supporting always!

The rapid spread of the coronavirus has sparked alarm worldwide. In the US, Millions of people’s daily lives have already been disrupted by its pandemic, but we know very little about the COVID-19 and the disease it caused. 

In SLEEPON, we believe that good sleep is critical for maintaining physical health and fight COVID-19. proper breathing and good sleep may be just the medicine you need to navigate the waves of the unknown. 

Studies show that getting good quality sleep is the best way to enhance and improve the immune system, people who don’t get enough quality sleep are more likely to get sick after being exposed to a virus. 

As we navigate the unknown and the attendant stress, fears, and challenges of the global Covid-19 coronavirus crisis, it can be difficult to stay relaxed and live as usual.

Here are two additional advice for GO2SLEEP users:

1. Have a real-time blood oxygen test at home with your GO2SLEEP if you feel anxious.

The SpO2 is an important parameter for judging people’s clinical condition, If you find that you are ever breathing harder or having trouble getting air each time you exert yourself, please take a real-time test with GO2SLEEP.

2. Don’t let COVID-19 social distancing ruin your sleep schedule.

If you don’t have to get up for work because of the closed businesses due to the COVID-19 pandemic, you may start staying up later and later at night and sleeping later and later in the morning.  Be aware of this! All of this upheaval can wreak havoc on your sleep schedule if you let it. 

Our bodies work best when they have a consistent sleep schedule, Please stay on schedule, go to sleep and wake up at the same time every day — even on weekends — is crucial for setting your body’s internal clock.

SLEEPON’s Action Plan in this period:

1. We have procured additional safety stock for all critical materials, components, and consumables used in manufacturing.

2. We will give you a Spring Special price which saves up to 30%, please check www.sleepon.us for more detail.

3. We are developing some amazing new features which will make the GO2SLEEP HST more powerful.

4. We will continue to monitor this situation closely and make every effort to be part of the solution to this unprecedented pandemic.


If you have any enquiries, please contact service@sleepon.us.
Have a nice day!

SLEEPON Team

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